Anyone who has been to one of my Design Classes (half-day or full-day) will know that I bang on about open-plan spaces quite a lot. I love them, but I don’t. I don’t love them when they are minimally furnished with very little going on with a huge open-plan space slap bang in the middle. Then I hate them. They feel empty offer, little privacy and quite frankly, totally suck!

What I do love about open-plan spaces is that you can do lots of different activities in one big space. I can’t imagine cooking anymore in a locked away space. I love that I look onto the dining area, the den, and the garden they all merge, flow and hang out together.

There are tricks of course (aren’t there always), here are a few:

CREATE ZONES AND LOTS OF LITTLE NOOKS

You don’t physically have to put up physical barriers but you can create physical borders with furniture, oversized plants, tables, and consoles. These pieces act as anchors, which are really key to making the overall space feel separate yet integrated.

COMMON THEMES

Different zones, like the kitchen area, dining space and living space all need to feel individual, but in order for them not to look a mess, you’ll need a common theme. Colour, style, texture, pattern common links that tie everything together.

GO BIG ON SOME THINGS

Open-plan spaces require statement pieces, pieces that are swoon-worthy and make your heart skip a beat. Large chandeliers, mirrors, and rugs are constantly in my repertoire.

REMEMBER THE MIX

Open-plan spaces have generally been tampered with to get that way –so they’re been modernised. Even if you’re rocking more of a traditional vibe, bear this in mind and add in other modern flourishes like the odd chair, lamp or cushion – it will feel far more balanced that way.

ADD MULTIPLE FOCAL POINTS

You don’t want to read a room in a second, if you do, then you’ve got one very boring room on your hands. Bland room syndrome equals rooms that have very little in them to engage and excite the eye.

Instead you want to enter a room and not know where to look. You want you’re eye to be being pulled in so different directions that you feel tantalised, excited, surprised and intrigued. Multiple focal points make you do that – game changers I say!